Roy's Blog: October 2014

October 27, 2014

Too busy is the excuse for not doing the right thing

A supreme pet peeve of mine.

We finish our meal and would like our table cleared of the left-over rubbish and debris.

We wait and wait and wait…

Servers fly by, careful to avoid eye contact with us.

Their response when I finally asked for help: “I would have cleared your table earlier but I was too busy.”

This is a common problem. People today are “too busy” to do the right thing; captivated in their moment rather than focussing on what is right.

“Too busy” to keep a promise, meet that friend for lunch, take the extra time needed to care for a customer or to say thank you to someone who has done you a favour.

“Too busy” is the rationalization for avoiding what should be attended to. It also serves the thrill some people get from “activity-mania”; they love to chase stuff. They aren’t focussed.

But it’s the easy way out.

Whenever you hear yourself thinking or talking “too busy”, STOP!

Be ruled by The Right Thing not Busyness.

Cheers,
Roy

BE DiFFERENT or be dead Book Series

Other articles you might like…

5 keys to start-up success
Great leaders look for the pony
How to avoid the new-idea trap
Tips for business success
6 tips for bucking the small business failure rate

 

  • Posted 10.27.14 at 04:30 am by Roy Osing
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October 23, 2014

Is irrelevance at your doorstep? What we can learn from Yahoo

Successful organizations are effective at creating a continuous stream of value that is highly relevant to their customers. They are not one-hit wonders.

They reinvent themselves to accommodate the volatility of the markets; the unpredictability of forces that impact them.

Cease to be relevant and you’re invisible, unremarkable, boring and eventually dead.

Take Yahoo. A recent USA Today article, “Managing Hopelessness at Yahoo” nicely overviewed the challenge the organization faces.

As of late Yahoo’s value has been driven by a single investment in the Chinese e-commerce company Alibaba. Yahoo now has $8 Billion in the bank after taking Alibaba public.

Now what?

With an incredible opportunity in front of them, the CEO seems incapable of communicating how the company will leverage the windfall to create ongoing value for their customers.

How they intend to be unique among their competition.

It doesn’t appear they have a strategic game plan to guide them.

No guide for investing to create value.

At least not one that I can see.

They may be on the slippery slope to irrelevance like many before them.

Road kill offers a lesson.

Be an active observer and don’t let the same thing happen to you.

Cheers,
Roy

BE DiFFERENT or be dead Book Series

Other articles you might like…

How to avoid the new-idea trap
Tips for business success
6 tips for bucking the small business failure rate
8 actions marketing leaders can take to stand out

 

 

  • Posted 10.23.14 at 01:35 am by Roy Osing
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October 20, 2014

A business isn’t human

How can it be?

A business is a pluralistic “society” with a very specific end game: deliver what is produced; what is manufactured; what is available for distribution and make money.

Most businesses push their products and services on people. Rarely do they see themselves in the “experience delivery business” where creating amazing memorable experiences for their customers is their raison d’être.

They focus on their products and try to wrap the “service thing” around them.

But there is no question what the priority is: sell product.

With this singularity of focus, how can the business society be human?

How can the employee herd amaze customers by serving them in an exemplary way when they are driven to make monthly sales targets?

They can’t.

Businesses can only be human if they lead with “serving humans” as their prime directive; if it forms the context for everything they do.

“Delivering Happiness” drives the behaviour of every Zappos employee, not selling shoes. Any wonder that Zappos is a model for providing the human experience in business? And by the way, if anyone doubts the economic value of delivering happiness, remember that Amazon bought this culture for over $1Billion.

Hypocrisy in motion is the ingenuous businesses declaration to “put you first” and “delight you” when all their employees are expected and rewarded to hit monthly revenue targets and cost reduction goals.

How can a Call Center rep possibly be motivated to dazzle their a client with a little extra caring and attention when management is only interested in the duration of the call and amount of revenue generated?

Business humanity requires a human purpose; most organizations unfortunately don’t see it this way.

Cheers,
Roy

BE DiFFERENT or be dead Book Series

Other articles you might like…

How to avoid the new-idea trap
Tips for business from Roy
6 tips for bucking the small business failure rate
8 actions marketing leaders can take to stand out

  • Posted 10.20.14 at 03:47 am by Roy Osing
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October 16, 2014

Roy’s tips for business success

Here are 6 actions you can take to avoid your new business being a death statistic... 6 tips for bucking the small business failure rate

If you copy others you give people ZERO reason to buy from you... Why benchmarking sucks

Look for a away to be a different breed NOT best of breed… Forget best of breed

Your mission statement should be on the ground NOT at 10,000 feet… The mission statement is the ultimate selfie

Provide value that people CARE about… “Sexy” gets too much attention

SUCCESS = (Doing) (lots of) (imperfect) (stuff) (fast)... Key winning concepts: action, speed, attempts, good enough

Provide your customers with a human experience and they won’t care about price… The uncomplication of business

Don’t say these in your zeal to be “customer driven”... We exist to delight you - blah!

Get on to the notion of “serving” people not servicing them… I really don’t want to be “serviced”, do you?

Who needs a traditional organization structure?... Flat organizations move quicker

5 ways to get your customers addicted to you… Customer addicts = loyalty = ongoing revenue

Cheers,
Roy

  • Posted 10.16.14 at 05:42 am by Roy Osing
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