Roy's Blog: June 2014

June 30, 2014

“Buying customers” is a misguided growth strategy

When I help companies develop their growth plan, they are very tempted to consider an acquisition as a fast and easy option. After all, if you want to grow revenues by $10 million over the next 24 months, why not buy a customer base that would yield that amount?

“Buying” customers may appear like low hanging fruit to achieve your growth intentions but it isn’t.

On paper, a merger might look like it was made in heaven but it rarely is.

The synergies cited and the common denominator between the two organizations often understate or mask the real challenges facing the marriage.

Integrating a new organization into an exiting one is NOT easy. Culture, operations, policy, systems and procedures differences make the combination anything but seamless and the acquired customers are often affected.

The difficulties in merging the entities are visible to them; their service is impacted and their loyalty wanes. There is no guarantee they will remain after the dust from the merge settles.

The intended growth plan is NOT realized.

There is no low hanging fruit when it comes to growing your customer base.

Nurture and expand your Tribe; those current customers who are with you because they know you and CARE about what you do.

Provide them with more personal solutions; packages of value that will excite them and motivate them to spread your word to others.

Build your Strategic Game Plan around organic growth; it is a more certain future for you.

Cheers,
Roy

BE DiFFERENT or be dead Book Series

Other articles you might like…

Can you say your company is the one and only?
Marketers: 7 things to stop; 7 things to start
12 reasons why marketing has to change to survive
Gems of leadership from Grandma

Welcome to flatland
It’s the little things that haunt you
Are you in the product or experience game?

June 23, 2014

Welcome to Flatland

I am always on the lookout for organizations that are DiFFERENT.  That’s the secret to winning and long term success.

Valve, out of Bellevue Washington is an interesting example of stepping out and going 180 degrees to The Herd.

Here is but one innovative approach they use to run their organization.

The complete scenario can be found in their Employee Handbook here—- “Welcome to Flatland”. Their way of saying that they don’t believe in a hierarchical organization structure.

That the ONLY way to get things done is through FLAT. Where results are not impeded by the need for multiple levels of scrutiny and approvals.

Imagine an organizational world with no bosses. All in favour? Ya, the cynics and control freaks will dismiss this approach mainly because it doesn’t fit “the norm”. 

I say that’s a GOOD thing. No one wins by being “normal”.

Winners are weird and are prepared to go against “how everyone else does it”.

I applaud Valve. Good on you guys.

Lesson: Look at what everyone else is doing and DO THE OPPOSITE. BE CoNTRARIAN

Conforming is boring. Fitting-in is boring and makes you invisible.

It’s safe but deadly.

Cheers,
Roy

BE DiFFERENT or be dead Book Series

Other articles you might like…

12 reasons why marketing has to change to survive
Old school leadership is out

It’s the little things that haunt you
Brand what you do and get credit for it
Are you in the product or experience game?

June 19, 2014

10 things leaders do to influence

Influence others: that’s what leaders do.

With every word you speak; with every move you make.

Here are 10 acts of influence for leaders. They will leave an indelible impression on everyone you touch.

1. Think before you speak. Words are like feathers in the wind. You can’t get them back.

2. Act on your words. Do what you say. People need to get that you follow up with action and are more that a bag of hot air.

3. Honor your frontline.

4. Honor +++++ your frontline supervisors.

5. Cancel internal meetings to be with a customer.

6. Celebrate anything and everything.

7. Laugh a lot.

8. Recognize quirky.

9. Encourage failing fast.

10. Celebrate imperfection.

Cheers,
Roy

BE DiFFERENT or be dead Book Series

Other articles you might like…

The deadliest sin in business
Gems of leadership from Grandma
8 practices of ‘dog food’ leaders

  • Posted 6.19.14 at 03:55 am by Roy Osing
  • Permalink

June 16, 2014

The “little things” will bring you down

Like eliminating the free coffee and making people pay $1.50 a cup or chase the coffee cart to get a complementary cup (cause they’re trying to recoup costs).

Like charging for renting an umbrella for the day when inclement weather hits during your vacation (cause they don’t trust that you will return it).

Like having to present a credit card to be served at an outside lounge location (cause they think you will leave without paying the bill).

Like charging seniors for a wheelchair (cause they want to balance their budget).

Like refusing a mother to board a Ferry because she was 10 cents short of the fare (cause it’s a STUPID Rule).

Like refusing to sell a T-Shirt on display (cause they don’t want to deplete their display inventory).

Like having no idea who you are even though you have done business with them for 10 years (cause they don’t care about YOU).

When will businesses realize that delighted PEOPLE control their destiny?

Take a look at the “little” things you are doing for efficiency, cost and control reasons.

You may be penny wise but pound foolish.

Cheers,
Roy

BE DiFFERENT or be dead Book Series

Other articles you might like…

12 reasons why marketing has to change to survive
How losing made me a better leader
You service cars, you SERVE people
Brand what you do and get credit for it
Are you in the product or experience game?